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Breast augmentation and the Dentist


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I've heard lots of diffrent things about going to the dentist after a breast augmentation and about taking antibiotics for a few days befor you go to help reduce the risk of developing capsular contracture but i was under the impression that capsular contracture was caused by bacteria getting into the open wound and on the implant during a BA. 

I have recently  chipped a tooth and think i would require a filling but all the conflicting information about the dentist and cc is confusing and unsure if i should wait to have my tooth fixed  (it is not painful ) just wanted to know your thoughts and i will be phoning my ps on Tuesday to ask them also. 

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Hey Lovely I haven't heard anything about this.  I also had a chip tooth in the front had it fixed before the revision they put me on an antibiotic a few days before I had the tooth fixed.  I didn't have any trouble thus far tooth is good and the girls are great.  Thank you for sharing looking forward to what you find out.  I go  back to PS next month I will ask her, plus I go for a cleaning in May with dentist.  

Hugs and Kisses

(   .   )(   .   )  PBB

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Wow thank you for this, I didn't know that bacterial infection was a possible contributor to capsular contracture!

I don't believe taking antibiotics in the days leading up to surgery would prevent a bacterial infection, abx would need to be taken straight after surgery instead to kill any foreign bacteria that made it into the breast pocket either on the implant or by some other means. But please correct me if I am wrong. Bacteria exist inside our bodies as well, I suppose it would be possible for our 'native' bacteria to form a biofilm on the implant and cause inflammation.

Since you've already had your implants in for over 3 months I would say that taking antibiotics before your filling wouldn't have a negative effect. But best to check with your dentist and surgeon, let us know what they say xx

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I did get CC after visiting the dentist for a check up and thorough clean several years ago with my second set of implants....my plastic surgeon said not to rule out the possibility that the development of cc and having my teeth cleaned were linked...not sure myself...I always take a small course of antibiotics now just a couple of days before a teeth clean now...

Interesting to note that at that particular teeth cleaning visit I did have a cut in my mouth (gum line) that bled more after my teeth cleaning...I won't risk it now, CC really sucks :( 

Just my personal experience on the matter.

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8 hours ago, Missbolt-ons said:

I did get CC after visiting the dentist for a check up and thorough clean several years ago with my second set of implants....my plastic surgeon said not to rule out the possibility that the development of cc and having my teeth cleaned were linked...not sure myself...I always take a small course of antibiotics now just a couple of days before a teeth clean now...

Interesting to note that at that particular teeth cleaning visit I did have a cut in my mouth (gum line) that bled more after my teeth cleaning...I won't risk it now, CC really sucks  

Just my personal experience on the matter.

Thanks for your post this was just the thing i was referring to in my original post as i had heard of somthing like this before, I will  be calli g my surgeon on Tuesday to check, but do you ask your doctor or dentist to prescribe the antibiotics ?

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There are many doctors/surgeons who suggest you take a course of antibiotics (bactrim from memory) before dental work.

My own anecdotal experience is that I had plenty of dental work over the past two years including teeth cleaning and also braces etc

I developed CC in my left breast and had both implants explanted last year - maybe a connection, may be not...who knows

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14 hours ago, Wanting boobs said:

Thanks for your post this was just the thing i was referring to in my original post as i had heard of somthing like this before, I will  be calli g my surgeon on Tuesday to check, but do you ask your doctor or dentist to prescribe the antibiotics ?

No worries :) I just use my usual doctor, who's aware of my lengthy breast implant complication history, but any GP should do it for you...some may just not be aware or have knowledge of this link...any broad spectrum antibiotic would do it...I just use keflex before any dental check up/clean because it's cheap and easy to get, hope this helps x 

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Hmm... this is very interesting. I remember when I had my wisdom teeth out (2 years after implants), my dentist told me that the operation would introduce no more bacteria into the bloodstream than flossing, and that he didn't prescribe antibiotics to take beforehand as a preventative. This was in relation to infective endocarditis, a potentially life-threatening infection of the heart. If having wisdom teeth removed introduces no more bacteria than flossing, surely a teeth cleaning is safe?

Come to think of it I actually had my teeth cleaned the same week as my BA. I remember being in my post-op bra and wondering if my hygienist would notice my new additions! :lol: If I had known about the link with CC I might have rescheduled.

I found this on one surgeon's site:

Capsular contracture does not always start soon after surgery. It might start months or even several years after surgery. So, there must be some other causes that happen after surgery.

A bacteremia means “bacteria in the blood stream”. Occasionally bacteria can get into our blood streams. We have white cells in the blood poised to kill those bacteria off. This usually works amazingly well. The bacteria are killed off and we know nothing about it. We remain well and are not aware of this happening. However, the theory is that some or even just one bacteria might escape the white cells and land on the scar capsule, where there is not much blood, and it can remain safe and multiply and form a biofilm, which will lead to capsular contracture.

So, how do bacteria get into the blood stream and how often does this occur? The answer again is “We are not sure”. We do know that whenever we have dental treatments, especially teeth cleaning, that a brief bacteremia occurs.

So, it seems prudent to avoid non-emergency dental care for a period of time after surgery while healing is taking place. Dr. Silverton suggests two (2) months, but any time is just a guess. Whenever dental treatment is required it seems like a good idea to give one great big dose of antibiotics to you just before your treatment to try to help the white cells do their job of killing off any bacteria. There is no proof that this works. It just seems like a good idea.

How long should you do this for? Probably as long as you have breast implants.

However, this might not be the only time that a bacteremia occurs. Perhaps it can occur with any infection, cold, urinary tract infection, upper respiratory infection or simply a pimple. It is not possible to give you an antibiotic for everything. So maybe this explains how capsular contractures occur a long time after the surgery. Many times there is nothing that the patient can think of that happened before the onset of capsular contracture.

http://www.silvertonmd.com/dealing-with-capsular-contracture/

I don't like the idea of taking antibiotics willy nilly, they have far-reaching effects beyond just prevention and can cause great damage to the gut microbiome, where 80% of our immune system resides. Then again, no one wants capsular contracture... Would be helpful to know if this is a cause or merely correlation.

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23 hours ago, Wanting boobs said:

Thanks for your post this was just the thing i was referring to in my original post as i had heard of somthing like this before, I will  be calli g my surgeon on Tuesday to check, but do you ask your doctor or dentist to prescribe the antibiotics ?

I've heard of this as well, please let us know what your surgeon says. Your dentist can prescribe antibiotics so you don't need a separate appointment for a GP :)

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